Falling ill will not foil my plan

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building on edge of Clark Kerr campus
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Looking up Tanglewood Path

 

I awoke on Christmas morning with a cold and a urinary tract infection, which not only dampened the holiday a bit but also threatened my path-wandering progress.

But yesterday I was feeling better, so I ventured out to tackle Tanglewood Path (#129), which is on the southern edge of UC’s Clark Kerr campus. I parked on Belrose Avenue and crossed Derby Street to Tanglewood Road, where the western entrance is clearly marked.

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Some flowers along the path

I went up the short staircase and began ascending the long straight walkway, where I passed a jogger and someone who looked like a student. To one side was a tall wooden fence with a fair amount of graffiti. To the other was a row of trees with long, narrow, smooth-edged leaves and bumpy, brown trunks hiding a chain link fence.

The end of the path becomes steep but has no steps or railing. I took it slow, not wanting to jeopardize my recovery, but I still found myself a bit winded.

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At the top, the path’s north side ends at the entrance to Claremont Canyon Regional Preserve, which I didn’t even know existed. It looked tempting, and it was a beautiful day, so I walked beyond Tanglewood Path onto the flatter terrain just for a bit.

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I saw a hound and a human companion entering the park itself, but I skirted the edge, which was more of a border between Clark Kerr Campus and the park. I stopped before passing through a gate that not only looked permanently open but also was not attached to any fence. Despite my sparse knowledge of botany, I was able to identify a row of eucalyptus. Or would that be eucalypti?

Off to timg_2601he side in a clump of young trees were two towels draped over branches. It wasn’t near any body of water that would suggest a swimming expedition, so I think it may have been a temporary shelter for someone who had no home.

Just south of the unmarked eastern entrance to Tanglewood Path lies quiet residential Stonewall Road, where one sign warned people not to leave valuables in parked cars and another let you know you were being watched.img_2608

Returning to my car, I passed another sign. This one seemed rather silly to me, so I ignored it.  No, I didn’t ignore it–I defied it. I twirled on my toes flagrantly before resuming my walk and suffered no consequences whatsoever. So there!

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2 thoughts on “Falling ill will not foil my plan

  1. I just noticed you on the urban hiker in CANCUN. I understand that you knew Deborah Frisch. I was one of her teachers at Escuela Xicalango in 1988. I met her briefly at the school in April and she convinced me to return to teach. Thence on July 4th of 1988 I reported to the school and became a teacher there. The experience changed my life.

    On Fri, Dec 30, 2016 at 1:31 PM, The Urban Hiker wrote:

    > tanya grove posted: ” I awoke on Christmas morning with a cold and a > urinary tract infection, which not only dampened the holiday a bit but also > threatened my path-wandering progress. But yesterday I was feeling better, > so I ventured out to tackle Tanglewo” >

    1. Oh my gosh! She influenced many people, judging from the turnout at her memorial service. I miss her still. Did you ever get to read her memoir of that experience, Mango for the Teacher?

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